GEAR REVIEW: Prospecs Power Walk 603 athletic shoes

by | November 24, 2013 | 2 comments Continue reading
Screen Shot 2013 11 24 at 11.01.15 AM GEAR REVIEW: Prospecs Power Walk 603 athletic shoes

Screenshot: My Prospecs Power Walk 603s

Why I’m feeling especially thankful for my very comfy sneakers

Don’t do what I did. Just before I left for a trip to Europe, which I knew would entail tons of walking, I scheduled a pedicure.

“You’re skin is so dry,” said the technician.

Yes, when you reach the age of 50, everything seems to dry up, shrivel up and require creams: eye creams, face creams, hand creams, skin creams, etc.

And although I know better, I’m negligent about applying cream to my soles each night. Sometimes I collapse in my bed but even when I have a few minutes of wakefulness, I’m afraid of using foot cream because I might slip in the bathroom during the night or get grease on the sheets, even with a pair of socks on.

So the nail technician continued scraping away, smiled and boasted, “See how smooth I’ve made your feet?” Then she applied a cream before she polished my nails a shiny red.

I was reading and checking email in the comfortable pedicure massage chair so I probably wasn’t attentive enough to how much dead skin she had scraped off. I left feeling good about my newly colored toenails.

Oh-oh

When I arrived at the airport in Frankfurt, Germany about thirty hours later, I felt a bit of discomfort so I slipped off my flimsy ballet flats at the airport lounge. OMG, I almost fell over when I saw the pool of blood in the insole.

Yes, I learned a few lessons:

  • Don’t ever allow a pedicurist to use a blade on your feet.
  • Don’t schedule a pedicure immediately before a trip.
  • Be attentive to what’s going on rather than multitasking.

So faced with my injury, I cleaned and bandaged my foot as soon as we arrived at our hotel in Budapest and switched to a pair of sneakers that I wore for the rest of our trip.

Now to the gear review

I had been sent a pair of walking shoes for review a few months ago, which I never had the chance to test. But I was very happy I had them with me on this trip. Made in Korea for more than thirty years, where they are reportedly the most popular walking shoes, Prospecs are now available in the U.S.

The athletic shoes I tested were Prospecs Power Walk 603s. They were lightweight (especially helpful when you’re packing them for travel), comfortable, and offered lateral stability that made my footing feel secure.

The cushioning and stability of the shoe allowed me to do plenty of walking while my injury healed. The mesh uppers were flexible and never felt confining. I traipsed over irregular cobblestones and used gangplanks to embark and disembark from our riverboat and a sightseeing boat. The athletic shoes were so comfortable that I didn’t want to take them off so on this trip, comfort trumped fashion! I felt so fortunate and thankful that my injury healed even with the constant pressure on my heels. The shoes are recommended to help runners’ feet and joints to recover. They surely helped my recovery.

A near perfect walking shoe, I’ve continued to love wearing them at home.

However, as a chic travel shoe, these had one drawback: The vivid colors (mine were purple and neon yellow) really stood out. While fun to wear at home or a beach resort, in European cities, they really stood out—more than I would have liked them to. I hope the company comes out with a model in the trendy dark hues worn by Europeans.

Two other lessons learned:

  • Taking multiple pairs of shoes with you when you travel, just in case.
  • Also carry a trusted athletic shoe like this one for heavy-duty walking.

Prospecs Power Walk 603 retail for $149.95 and are available online and at some retail locations.

Disclosure: We were provided with a review sample of this product but any opinions expressed in this post are our own.

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Category: BOOKS & GEAR

Comments (2)

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  1. Sheryl says:

    Thank goodness for comfy sneakers! So sorry about that injury; sounds so painful. I think blades are not allowed to be used in pedicures, although the rules vary from state to state.

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